De Gruchy ships

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De Gruchy ships


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Circassian


Members of the de Gruchy family were major shipowners
in the 18th and 19th centuries

Ships of Thomas de Gruchy, master mariner

  • 1793: Rose, 80-ton sloop; where built unknown. Owner and master: Thomas de Gruchy. Later master (1798): Abraham Millais. Southampton trade, armed with four cannon; not obliged to sail in convoy. Owned 1793-1804.
  • 1798: Robert and Jane, 38-ton vessel, used as a privateer. Owners: Thomas Mallet, merchant, and Thomas de Gruchy, master mariner. Masters: Samuel Gasnier, 1798; Capt Le Brocq, 1799; Capt Bisson, 1799. Also used as a Plymouth to Jersey packet
  • 02/02/1799: Anna Packet, tonnage unknown, Southampton packet. Owner: Captain Thomas de Gruchy
  • 1804 Rose, 65-ton cutter. Owners: Thomas de Gruchy, Philip de Gruchy and Philip Nicolle. Built in Jersey, in 1804; Southampton packet. Master: Thomas de Gruchy. Lost with log, 1809.
  • 1811: Rose, 80-ton cutter, perhaps built in Cowes, in 1811. Owners: Le Vesconte, Le Sueur and Thomas de Gruchy. Master: Thomas de Gruchy until 1825.

Ships of Abraham de Gruchy

  • 18/12/1814: Godfray, de Gruchy and Le Brocq, an informal trading association for chartering and shipping
  • 1815: Le Brocq, Godfray et Moi (de Gruchy), as above
  • 15/08/1818: Friends, cutter, chartered by Abraham de Gruchy from London to export potatoes to England
  • 15/08/1818: Rachel, cutter, chartered, as above, to export potatoes to England
  • 26/09/1818: Tom and Mary, 114-ton Snow. Owners: Philip Godfray, François Jeune, Nicolas Le Quesne, John Thomas, Philip Le Feuvre, Abraham de Gruchy and Charlotte Benest (wife of Jean Benest, son of François), merchants and Philip Le Quesne, mariner. Masters: Philip Le Quesne (1818) and Philip Alexandre (1821). She was used in the general carrying trade and sold in 1826
  • 07/06/1827: Rose, 80-ton schooner, built in Yarmouth. Woman-bust figurehead. Owner: Abraham de Gruchy, merchant. Master: Philip Alexandre (supposed drowned, lost with ship and crew, by 1835). Used in the cod trade between Canada and South America, usually returning with either coffee or wines and spirits
  • 06/02/1835: Canada, 144-ton brig. Owners: Philip Pellier and Abraham de Gruchy, merchants. Master: Peter Le Feuvre. Used in the cod trade, she was sold in 1836 to de Garis Brothers, Sailmakers, and wrecked in the same year
Abraham de Gruchy's brigantine Gem, probably sailing in 1848 off the coast of South America, where she regularly traded, judging by the white buildings in the background. His pre-1863 house flag is shown on the mainmast
  • 26/01/1848: Gem, 114-ton brigantine, built in Poole, 1847. Owner: Abraham de Gruchy, merchant. Masters: Frank Le Marquand and Peter Horman (1853). Used in the cod trade, she was sold in 1855 to Falle and Company of Burin, Newfoundland. She was lost after touching a rock at Chateau Rouge, near Burin, in 1875, coming from Barbados
  • 21/08/1851: Mary, 35-ton schooner, built in Gaspé, 1847. Owner: Abraham de Gruchy, merchant. Master: George Gilman. Used in the cod trade, she was sold in Canada, 1855
  • 27/01/1854: Friends, 196-ton brig, built in Granville, 1853. Owners: Isaac Malzard, Charles Le Quesne and Abraham de Gruchy, merchants. Masters: Nicholas Richards (1854) and F G Jean. Trading directly with Brazil, she was sold in 1857
  • 20/06/1855: Newnham, 148-ton brig, built in Wales. Owners (1855): James Ashby Newnham, merchant, Peter Le Maistre of Liverpool, shipbroker, John Ereault, chemist and George Malzard, mariner. In Jersey Almanacs, under Jersey Shipping: Charles Le Quesne and Abraham de Gruchy, who bought the vessel in 1856 (John Jean letter, 6/4/1987). Master: George Malzard. She was sold in 1857
  • 13/02/1857: Canada, 156-ton brig, 99 foot length, 22 foot breadth; built in Gaspé, 1856. Owner: Abraham de Gruchy, merchant. Master: Peter Horman. Used in the cod trade, she was transferred to De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement

Ships of de Gruchy, Renouf and Clement

  • 1863 (13/10/1854): Circassian, 105-ton schooner, built in Granville, 1854. Owners: Thomas Renouf and Thomas Deal, ship agents, Thomas Le Huquet, mariner, and Philip Mauger, merchant. Masters: Thomas Le Huquet (1854), John Amy (1869) and Edward Dupré. She was sold in 1874
  • 1863 (15/09/1858): Hearty, 36-ton dandy/ketch, built in Jersey, 1849. Owners: Thomas Renouf and John Clement, merchants, Henry Philip Erith, mariner. Masters: Philip Hamon (1859) and Henry Philip Erith. John Jean states that she was wrecked on the 29/01/1900 on the Casquets
  • 1863 (13/11/1860): Sara Horne, 199-ton barque, built in Nova Scotia, 1846. Owners: Thomas Renouf, John Clement and Philip Mauger, merchants. She was sold on 25/06/1861
  • 1863 (12/09/1862): Dolphin, 54, then 63-ton Schooner, built by Picot of Jersey at Gorey Village slip, 1862. Owners: Thomas Renouf and John Clement, merchants, Henry Philip Erith, mariner and William Philip de Gruchy (1870). Masters: Henry Philip Erith, J F Cort, and Charles de Ste Croix. She was sold in 1877
  • 25/06/1863: Warrior, 163 ton Schooner, built in Newport, Monmouthshire, 1847, with a warrior figurehead. Owners: Thomas Renouf, John Clement and Philip Mauger, merchants and William Philip de Gruchy (1869), merchant. Master: Charles de Ste Croix. She sailed from Boston to Newfoundland on 06/01/1877 and was "never seen afloat again". Letter by W P de Gruchy to The Collector of Customs, Jersey; 29 May 1877... The wreck of the schooner Warrior on the west coast of Newfoundland was entirely broken up... not any sign of the crew.” Those believed drowned included Charles de Ste Croix, master, aged 43 years, Philip Sauvage, first mate, aged 30 years, Frank Hacquoil, aged 28 years, Edward Renels, aged 19 years, Philip Crepin, aged 18 years and Edward Goods, aged 16 years
  • 1864: Swallow, 30-ton schooner, built at Cape Breton, 1851. Owners: De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement. She left the owners' Jersey list in 1880
  • 27/03/1865: Harmony, 136-ton brig, built in Jersey, 1824 by Gavey and Nicolle. Owners: William Philip de Gruchy, Thomas Renouf and Philip Clement, merchants. Masters: Richard Philip Bertram, Thomas Gruchy and others. She was lost at Rose Blanche, off the Coast of Newfoundland, 09/12/1868: “the whole of the crew with the exception of Helier Arthur, were drowned”.
  • 1865: Nimble, 45-ton schooner, built in Dartmouth, 1843. She left the owners` Jersey list in 1875.
  • 02/03/1866: Royal Blue Jacket, 94-ton schooner, built at Cowes, IoW, 1854. Figurehead: A male figurehead wearing a royal blue jacket. Owners: William Philip de Gruchy, Thomas Renouf and John Clement, merchants. Masters: John Le Brocq, Frank Le Marquand and Philip Theodore Le Touzel. The Jersey Times (17/12/1881) bore the following notice: "Intelligence has reached the Island of the loss of the schooner Royal Blue Jacket, 93 tons. She left Jersey on Sunday, 13 November for Newfoundland, with a general cargo. On Tuesday, the 6th inst, a heavy sea prevailing at the time, the master Le Touzé (Philip Theodore Le Touzel), P Le Monnier, steward, Victor Hamon, seaman, Jorginkson and T Le Masurier, and passengers, were washed overboard. On Sunday, the 11th instant, the schooner, her masts having been previously cut away, was battling helplessly with the waves, when the Norwegian vessel Tordenskgald, Captain Hammen, fortunately hove in sight, and noticing the signal of distress, bore down upon the disabled craft, and succeeded in rescuing the survivors of the crew - Drelaud, mate; Mourant, boatman; Siouville, seaman; Andre Auge, boy. They were landed at Liverpool, and are expected to arrive in the Island on Tuesday next. The Royal Blue Jacket was insured in the Jersey Mutual Insurance Society. This declaration of the vessel`s loss was evidently premature. She must have been subsequently towed to safety and repaired, as the Jersey Shipping Register records her sale to Cork in 1882. [1]
De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement's flagship, the barque Eliza at Naples
  • 1867: Annie, 92-ton schooner, built by Daniel Le Vesconte at First Tower, with a woman figurehead. Owners: as above. Master: John Beaugié. She was sold to France in February 1873.
  • 06/06/1868: Canada, 156-ton brig; belatedly transferred to the list by the heirs of the late Abraham de Gruchy. Masters: John Le Couteur Dorey (1866), John Thomas Orsato (1870), Captain Love (1886) and J B Poingdestre (1888). She was lost on Figueira Bar, Portugal, on 26 March 1888 [2]
  • 31/03/1870: Sultana, 138-ton brigantine, built by Clarke in Jersey, 1840, with a woman figurehead. Owners: as above. Masters: Edward Renouf (1870), J Pirouet (1884), J T Carchuo (1887) and J B Poingdestre. She left the owners` list in the early 1890s.
  • 1870: Jessie, 36-ton schooner, built in Cape Breton. Owners: as above. She left the owners` Jersey list by 1880
  • 22/04/1870: C Columbus, 204-ton brigantine, built in Paspébiac for Robin Brothers, 1825. She was sold by the latter. Owners: William Philip de Gruchy, Thomas Renouf and John Clement, merchants. Masters: E P Le Feuvre and Captain Abraham de Gruchy (1870). She was sold abroad, 27/12/1870
  • 1870: Aimwell, 40-ton schooner. Owners: as above. She was lost on the coast of Newfoundland in 1873
  • 1870: Brisk, 32-ton schooner. Owners: as above. She left the owners` Jersey list by 1885
  • 02/11/1870: Eliza, 183-ton barque, previously 191 tons, built in America?; a prize taken by HMS Tribune in 1808 and owned for many decades by the former Nicolle and Company and previously captained by John Clement. Owners: Philippe Nicolle and then (1870) William Philip de Gruchy, Thomas Renouf and John Clement, merchants. Masters: Many, including John Clement. She was lost in 1891, disappearing with her crew, on a voyage to Santos, Brazil.
  • 1871: Golden Era, 44-ton schooner. Owners: Messrs. de Gruchy, Renouf and Clement. She left the owners` Jersey list by 1875.
  • 1871: Ostrich, 22-ton schooner. Owners: as above. She left the owners` Jersey list by 1876
De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement's 149 ton schooner Bonny Mary, built in Gorey by Philip Bellot, c/o Commander Peter Pallot
  • 18/01/1873: Bonny Mary, 149-ton schooner, built by Philip Bellot at Gorey, 1863, near the tennis courts, with a woman figurehead. Owners: William Philip de Gruchy, Thomas Renouf and John Clement, merchants. Masters: Clement Pallot (former owner) and Elias Pallot. She left the owners` list in 1888
  • 1874: Alabama, 18-ton schooner, built in Canada. Owners: as above. Master: Philip Blampied (1873). She left the owners` list in 1876
  • 1874: Alarm, 17-ton schooner. Owners: as above.[3]
  • 1874: Comet, 19-ton schooner, as above. She left the owners` Jersey list in 1884
  • 1874: Ellen, 16-ton schooner, as above. She was sold abroad in 1879
  • 1874: Laurel, 14-ton schooner. Owners: as above
  • 1874: Mountaineer, 60-ton schooner, built in La Poile, Newfoundland in 1845 by Daniel Le Couteur, for Nicolle and Company Owners: as above. She was broken up in 1875
  • 1874: Rosanna, 23-ton schooner, as above. She left the owners` Jersey list by 1882
  • 1874: Thomas, 19-ton schooner, as above
  • 16/04/1875: Milton, 149-ton schooner, built by Bellot and Noel at Gorey, 1863, near the Tennis Courts. Owners: Wm. Ph. de Gruchy, Thomas Renouf and John Clement, merchants. Masters: Francis Edward Benest (1873) and George John Le Marquand. She was wrecked near Aracaya, Brazil, 02/12/1880
  • 1875: Laura, 10-ton yacht. Owners: as above
  • 15/08/1876: Martha Brader, 92-ton schooner, built in Grimsby, 1856. Owners: Edward Clement of 75 Colomberie, mariner. Held under mortgage dated 13/05/1874 by Philip Payn and Philip de Gruchy (the latter a shareholder in De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement). Master: Edward Clement. She was wrecked on the 26/05/1886, off Terschelling, Holland. The crew were all saved
  • 1877: 'Gipsy Queen', 24-ton schooner. Owners: De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement
  • 1877: Gannet, 13-ton schooner. Owners: as above.
  • 1877: Blooming Dale, 40-ton schooner. Owners: De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement. Master: Not known. She was lost on the Coast of Newfoundland, August 1882
  • 1882: Amanda, 28-ton schooner. Owners: as above. She left the owners` Jersey list by 1885
  • 1884: G R C , (the owners' initials]: 15-ton schooner. She featured in the owners` Jersey list in 1885 but was always registered abroad. [4]

Ships of Elie de Gruchy, master mariner, then merchant at 19 Broad Street, St Helier

  • 19/04/1808: Hope, 57-ton brigantine, Foreign built prize of war. Owners: John Le Vesconte, Francis Le Rossignol, both merchants, Elias de Gruchy, mariner and master, Amice Le Geyt and Philip Romeril, both mariners. Privateer, taken, with the Register in 1811.
  • 01/01/1822: Hazard, 61-ton schooner, square sterned, carvel-built, with scroll figurehead. Built in Newfoundland, in 1820. Owners: James Bisson, merchant and co-owner and master: Elias de Gruchy
  • 1824: Horatio, 28-ton cutter, built in Cowes, Isle of Wight, in 1810. Owner and master: Elias de Gruchy
  • 27/07/1827: Guernsey Lily, 44-ton cutter, built in Guernsey, in 1825. Owner and master: Elias de Gruchy, 1827-1838. The vessel`s pennant was a pink and white lily on a red field: [5]
  • 1835: No 2, 20-ton cutter, sold in 1837
De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement's schooner Royal Blue Jacket in a gale

Ships of Philip de Gruchy and Company

  • 1847: Fairy, 52-ton cutter, built by Bartlett, in Jersey, in 1847. Owner and master: Philip de Gruchy
  • by 1857: Ninus, 59-ton schooner, built by Deslandes, in Jersey, in 1840. Formerly owned by de Quetteville
  • by 1857: Harriet, schooner-brig. [6]
Le Maistre and de Gruchy's 264 ton barque Eliza Hands

Ships of Charles de Gruchy, master mariner

  • 13/08/1851: Agenoria, 116-ton schooner, built by Deslandes, in Jersey, in 1840. Co-owner
  • 1851: Dispatch, 43-ton cutter, built by Le Sueur, in Jersey, 1851
  • 12/1852: Renard, 126-ton schooner-brig. Owners: Joshua Renouf, Merchant, John Renouf, Ironmonger and Charles de Gruchy, Master Mariner. "Wrecked at Dover, broken in pieces, 25th September 1860": Jersey Shipping Register.
  • 1856: Xanthe, 30-ton schooner. Owner and master: Charles de Gruchy
  • 29/08/1862: Admiral, 200-ton barque, later 215 tons, built in Dunkirk, France, in 1841. Owners: Edward Joshua Gallichan, Shipowner and Charles de Gruchy, Master Mariner, 32 shares each
  • 1863: Eliza Hands, 264-ton barque, built by Clarke, in Jersey, 1855. Owners: Le Maistre and de Gruchy, 1863-1876. Master: Charles de Gruchy, the co-owner. An oil on canvas painting of this ship survives within Captain de Gruchy`s family
  • 1865: Eliza and Maria, 219-ton barque, built in Jersey, 1864. Owners: Charles de Gruchy and Gallichan, 1865-1870

Notes and references

  1. An oil painting of this ship passing Mount Vesuvius in Italy, is in the possession of Jersey Heritage and is reproduced in J Jean, Jersey Sailing Ships (Phillimore, 1982)
  2. J Jean, Tales of Jersey`s Tall Ships, (Jersey: La Haule Books, 1994)
  3. These smaller schooners were known as `Banks Schooners,` as such companies as De Gruchy, Renouf and Clement used them –or the ships` boats they carried -for actually fishing on the Grand Banks, off Newfoundland. Usually, they only operated as trading vessels with the year`s final catch, in the autumn. The larger vessels above were, however, used almost exclusively as trading vessels, carrying fish to South America or to the Mediterranean, where the cargo was sold. For the homeward voyage, coffee, sugar, wines and spirits were the usual cargoes.
  4. Vessels so designated in Jersey almanacs were not necessarily sold at any particular date. Some Jersey firms, including de Gruchy, Renouf and Clement, transferred some or more of their vessels` registrations from Jersey to other, usually Canadian ports. The purpose, in the event of further 1873-style bank crashes, was to protect them from seizure by the Jersey authorities. For details of the demise in 1886 of this partnership, see Abraham de Gruchy.
  5. Jersey and Guernsey Almanac, 1827; "Captain de Gruchy". Elie de Gruchy`s principal line of business was shipping local produce, especially corn, to the United Kingdom.
  6. This vessel and Ninus were co-owned, and smentioned in his 1857 will, by Philip de Gruchy
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